38 Harrison Street, Brunswick East VIC 3057

Partial demolition and external alteration to the existing dwelling, construction of seven triple storey dwellings, reduction to the car parking requirement and removal of vegetation

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We found this application for you on the planning authority's website 12 months ago. It was received by them 7 months earlier.

(Source: Moreland City Council, reference MPS/2020/799)

11 Comments

Have your say by adding your own comment.

  1. Louise Partridge commented

    This seems like an inappropriate level of over development so close to Merri Creek. I am worried about the environmental impact and loss of green space. Further, I worry about the loss of amenity during the construction period. The Merri Creek paths are always well used and have been a vital resource for the community during lockdown. A construction site that will block this natural resource when we need it so dearly during covid would be a huge blow to the local community.

  2. Mark Jenkinson commented

    A reduction in car parking is a developer byword for easy profit at expense of local amenity, removing vegetation is also fraught, are they removing established mature trees?

  3. Shauna-Marie Wilson commented

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will dominate the surrounds and not respond positively to the surrounding context.

    The built form, design, materials and colours will dominate the surrounds, intrude upon the neighbourhood character, and respond negatively to the surrounding context.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Heritage Overlay HO90.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Environmental Significance Overlay ESO1.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Design and Development Overlay DDO1.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay LSIO.

    A large number of surrounding lots to the north, south, east and west of the site are also subject to the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay LSIO and the massing of the buildings will divert and obstruct overland water flows and the extent of increased paved areas upon the site will increase the velocity of overland water flows and increase the risk of inundation of neighbouring sites during heavy precipitation events due to combined factors of obstruction, diversion and increased velocities of overland water flows.

    Various aspects of the proposed works will obstruct, divert, and increase the velocity of overland water flows.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will adversely impact upon the amenity of neighbouring properties.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will adversely impact upon the amenity of the Merri Bushland Corridor.

    The proposal does not contemplate meaningful landscaping that would integrate the built form with the surrounding context especially with the retention of canopy trees and the plantings of indigenous canopy trees, shrubs and other plants all of the local ecological vegetation class.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will create unacceptable visual bulk and be intrusive upon the Merri Bushland Corridor.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will create unacceptable overshadowing impacts.

    The site is directly adjacent to, and overlooking, the Merri Creek

  4. Shauna-Marie Wilson commented

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will dominate the surrounds and not respond positively to the surrounding context.

    The built form, design, materials and colours will dominate the surrounds, intrude upon the neighbourhood character, and respond negatively to the surrounding context.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Heritage Overlay HO90.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Environmental Significance Overlay ESO1.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Design and Development Overlay DDO1.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will not meet the requirements of the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay LSIO.

    A large number of surrounding lots to the north, south, east and west of the site are also subject to the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay LSIO and the massing of the buildings will divert and obstruct overland water flows and the extent of increased paved areas upon the site will increase the velocity of overland water flows and increase the risk of inundation of neighbouring sites during heavy precipitation events due to combined factors of obstruction, diversion and increased velocities of overland water flows.

    Various aspects of the proposed works will obstruct, divert, and increase the velocity of overland water flows.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will adversely impact upon the amenity of neighbouring properties.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will adversely impact upon the amenity of the Merri Bushland Corridor.

    The reduction in the carparking requirement will adversely impact upon the amenity of the surrounding properties.

    The proposal does not contemplate meaningful landscaping that would integrate the built form with the surrounding context especially with the retention of canopy trees and the plantings of indigenous canopy trees, shrubs and other plants all of the local ecological vegetation class.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will create unacceptable visual bulk and be intrusive upon the Merri Bushland Corridor.

    The height, scale, massing, intensity and lack of setbacks will create unacceptable overshadowing impacts.

    The site is directly adjacent to, and overlooking, the Merri Creek.

    I submit that the concerns I address above are sufficiently significant that they cannot be mitigated by suitable conditions and that in my view, the only appropriate outcome from the Responsible Authority is a determination of REFUSAL.

  5. Sarah Jane commented

    1. This seems in conflict with Moreland councils 2019 plan:
“Canopy Tree Planting in Residential Areas -To promote climate responsive landscape design in residential development to support thermal comfort, reduce the urban heat island effect and improve medium density housing”
 https://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/globalassets/areas/amendments/amendmentslib-7208/c189/background-report---canopy-tree-planting-in-residential-areas.pdf

    2. It is important to keep this green corridor between Jones park and the Merri Creek to assist wildlife.


    3. By rotating the development 180 degrees (ie car spaces on the opposite side) and moving it a little further back from the creek, the development could still go ahead while still protecting these trees and reducing impact to their root systems.

    Many thanks for your consideration,

  6. Cath commented

    It is of concern to me that this planned development will remove habitat and vegetation in an area where we have very limited green space. It takes approximately 200 years for trees to be suitable for hollows and animal habitat and by removing mature trees this reduces that opportunity.

    Further it is right next to the creek and disturbs the green space and the corridor

    We have many medium to high density developments along major roads nearby and I think any development near the creek should be low density and low impact

    Thank you for your consideration

  7. Sara commented

    I am concerned for the loss of mature vegetation in an area with limited established green space. Removal will impact wildlife by reducing their habitat, will contribute to increase temperature from reduced shade and will upset the green aesthetic.

    This development is in conflict with Moreland council's own objective to support thermal comfort through the planting of canopy trees. Why disrupt an area with pre-existing trees that have been there for over a century? Everyone understands there is a need for more medium density housing however, the site of new developments should consider the long term impact destruction of existing habitat will have on current residents and wildlife.

  8. Kylie Marty commented

    I think the loss of mature trees is a loss to the local environs, and the construction of yet more townhouses will take away rather than add to the amenity of the area. Please don’t chop down those beautiful trees. The areas need the precious Merri creek need to be protected!

  9. Lou Baxter commented

    Yet again developer's often excessive profits seem more important than residential concerns and the amenities of the local area. Mature trees should not be destroyed and the development is too close to the Merri creek for its size. Indeed removing mature green trees is totally unacceptable - council should be making certain that mature trees and green habitat are preserved.
    And what a surprise - the developers want to reduce the parking requirements! The ongoing loss of parking is slowly but steadily creating very unpleasant neighbourhoods to live in as more squabbles over parking occur and neighbour is pitted against neighbour!
    It is absolutely disgraceful that the removal of fixed building requirements so many decades ago should have led to the over crowding of the inner suburbs which is currently occurring - developments are judged on a one-by-one basis and the plight of people who live in the area and who are forced to live with the results is ignored. The density of people per hectare alone shows how the inner suburbs are being destroyed.

  10. Rebecca Jacobs commented

    I object to this application. The planned destruction of the natural environment so close to the Merri Creek is a absolute disgrace to consider, these areas should be preserved and fought for by our council as a top priority, as they outlined in their 2019 plan. There is no solution that can be put forward that will replace the value of the 100 year old trees that will be destroyed if this goes ahead. Now more than ever it is critical that we think about the environment and plan something that supports and allows the local wildlife to thrive, not just fight for survival.
    The high density of this proposal is also inappropriate for the area so close to the creek, especially without a focus on a solution to basic amenities like parking that will put pressure on council residents to manage, rather than being built into the plan. To consider building on this land should focus on low impact, low density housing sufficient for the type of area.
    This entire proposal goes against the councils own objectives, and against the wishes of the citizen living in the area and I hope it will be thoughtfully reconsidered.

  11. Joseph Moloney commented

    This is an important development.

    Melbourne is a rapidly growing city and we need more, higher-density housing where people want to live and work.

    This location is close jobs and transport, and is surrounding by green space. It is a perfect candidate for higher-density housing. I live at 48 Harrison street and support this.

    Most existing residents prefer their neighbourhoods to stay the same, but this is irreconcilable with a growing city, particularly one in the midst of a housing affordability crisis.

    The council should put more weight on the unrepresented views of those who might want to live in this highly desirable spot.

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