34-36 MacPherson Street Bronte NSW 2024

Remove one (1) Eucalyptus sp. From parking area near Lugar Brae Avenue – this tree has dieback and an excessive amount of deadwood. It is positioned in a location where it has insufficient space to develop. As the tree matures and expands, it will continue to extensively damage to the neighbouring garage. Remove one (1) Pinus radiata from the rear of the building – this tree is unsuitable & unsustainable in its location. There is insufficient room for it to grow and develop as it is being suppressed by the Euc. Saligna. Prune one (1) Eucalyptus saligna at rear of building.

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We found this application for you on the planning authority's website 2 months ago. It was received by them 1 day earlier.

(Source: Waverley Council, reference TPO-29/2021)

11 Comments

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  1. J Huber commented

    Dear Sir/Madam

    When the state has lost such a huge number of animals and trees in the bushfires, removing large trees in NSW is anachronistic. We are at an ecological tipping point following the bushfires.

    Many bird species have sought refuge in the city while the burnt forests recover.. They have lost their normal nesting sites and food.

    The biodiversity hotspot of the state was the Shoalhaven, which is a huge pregion south of Sydney extending to the far south coast. 80% of the Shoalhaven was burnt out including 90% of its national parks.

    The Shoalhaven has lost 72% of its terrestrial animals and the bird loss has not yet been calculated. The percentage loss in other parts of the state from the 2019/2020 fires, and from the drought, is not available, but is massive.

    Our surviving wildlife is in extremis and we need to include this in consideration of any tree removal.

    And apart from the fauna loss, there is a huge percentage of tree loss, which means there are less trees to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, so the speed of the onset of climate change is increased. If we don't want our planet to turn into a hard brown rock like our sister planet Venus, which was a blue and green planet before it overheated, then we must start being serious in all that we do to slow climate change.

    Any trees, especially mature ones, should be retained now unless they pose a danger.

  2. Jhuber commented

    Dear Sir/Madam

    When the state has lost such a huge number of animals and trees in the bushfires, removing large trees in NSW is anachronistic. We are at an ecological tipping point following the bushfires.

    Many bird species have sought refuge in the city while the burnt forests recover.. They have lost their normal nesting sites and food.

    The biodiversity hotspot of the state was the Shoalhaven, which is a huge pregion south of Sydney extending to the far south coast. 80% of the Shoalhaven was burnt out including 90% of its national parks.

    The Shoalhaven has lost 72% of its terrestrial animals and the bird loss has not yet been calculated. The percentage loss in other parts of the state from the 2019/2020 fires, and from the drought, is not available, but is massive.

    Our surviving wildlife is in extremis and we need to include this in consideration of any tree removal.

    And apart from the fauna loss, there is a huge percentage of tree loss, which means there are less trees to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, so the speed of the onset of climate change is increased. If we don't want our planet to turn into a hard brown rock like our sister planet Venus, which was a blue and green planet before it overheated, then we must start being serious in all that we do to slow climate change.

    Any trees, especially mature ones, should be retained now unless they pose a danger.

  3. Karen commented

    I can only agree. Mature trees especially at this size should be retained. Too many have been lost already during the light rail construction.

  4. Virginia Milson Bronte Beach Precinct commented

    'The Bronte Beach Precinct Committee is concerned by the proposal to remove three trees, but does understand that one of the mature Gum trees, the Tasmanian Blue Gum may not be able to absorb the major pruning that appears to be required (ca 30%) for long-term survival. However, we ask that Council will recommend a requisite pruning of the less mature Sydney Gum and the Mexican Pine tree rather than wholesale removal . We understand that proportionately less pruning of these will be required and locally Bronte needs to conserve as many trees as it possibly can. After all, its own policy is still targeting the achievement of a larger percentage of green canopy in this area than currently exists.'
    Further these trees provide attractive greenery and shade.They would also provide important habitat for birds and other fauna.

  5. Susan Hely commented

    'The Bronte Beach Precinct Committee is concerned by the proposal to remove three trees, but does understand that one of the mature Gum trees, the Tasmanian Blue Gum may not be able to absorb the major pruning that appears to be required (ca 30%) for long-term survival. However, we ask that Council will recommend a requisite pruning of the less mature Sydney Gum and the Mexican Pine tree rather than wholesale removal . We understand that proportionately less pruning of these will be required and locally Bronte needs to conserve as many trees as it possibly can. After all, its own policy is still targeting the achievement of a larger percentage of green canopy in this area than currently exists.'
    Further these trees provide attractive greenery and shade.They would also provide important habitat for birds and other fauna.

  6. J Huber commented

    I agree and endorse the comments of the Bronte Beach Precinct Committee

  7. Kate Watson commented

    I agree with the comments above.

    Tree removal should only be allowed where the tree poses a danger or is blocking drains. Our losses were vast in the recent fires and further climate change will bring further tree loss.

    New tree plantings will take decades to grow and will not be enough. We must preserve the trees we have unless there is a serious reason for removal. .

  8. Vicky Edema commented

    I agree with the comments above. I understand that the large tree near the parking area in Lugar Brae Ave is not in a good condition but see no real reason for the removal of the healthy Pinus Radiata which has suddenly been deemed unsuitable. The pruning of the Euc Salinga at least will see that tree retained.
    It is disappointing to see any trees being removed from the area when they are a haven for birds and we rely on them to provide shade and most importantly to help counter climate change.

  9. Karen commented

    I completely support this DA. Many children play at the end of Lugar Brae Avenue as it’s a cul de sac. Branches frequently fall from the tree posing a significant risk particularly to children. Injury could also be caused to adults, vehicles and other assets. It overhangs the street and reduces lighting causing safety concerns. The tree should have been planted somewhere more appropriate. I suggest trees could be planted in one of the nearby parks to appease the dissenters who I note do not live in Lugar Brae Ave and are not put at risk by these dangerous trees.

  10. Vicky Edema commented

    I agree with the comments above. I understand that the large tree near the parking area in Lugar Brae Ave is not in a good condition but see no real reason for the removal of the healthy Pinus Radiata which has suddenly been deemed unsuitable. The pruning of the Euc Salinga at least will see that tree retained.
    It is disappointing to see any trees being removed from the area when they are a haven for birds and we rely on them to provide shade and most importantly to help counter climate change.

  11. J Huber commented

    I agree and endorse the comments of the Bronte Beach Precinct Committee

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